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  • BSI Flex 1903 v1:2023-08 formally released

    This is an interactive version 1 of BSI Flex 1903 v1.0:2023-08. The aim of the standard is to create a lexicon of standard terms and acronyms used in this sector.

    We welcome your engagement and comments on this version to help inform the development of the next version. Comments on clauses or terms in the standard should be made via the BSI Standards Development Portal. We would also welcome general feedback including what terms could be considered for future versions and these can be made through our dedicated feedback page.

3 Terms and definitions

3.1 Terms and definitions
A
  1. advanced air mobility (AAM)  

    next generation of air transport systems intended for both urban air mobility (3.1.86) and regional air mobility (3.1.75) solutions utilizing electric/hybrid powered aircraft within an integrated digital infrastructure NOTE 1 AAM envisions the use of autonomous or semi-autonomous flight capabilities. NOTE 2 “AAM is not a single technology, but rather a collection of new and emerging technologies being applied to the aviation transportation system, particularly in new aircraft types” (S
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  2. aerodrome  

    defined area (including any buildings, installations, and equipment) on land or water or on a fixed, fixed offshore or floating structure intended to be used either wholly or in part for the arrival, departure and surface movement of aircraft NOTE Also see related term “vertiport (VPT)” ( 3.1.88). [SOURCE: GREAT BRITAIN. UK Regulation (EU) No. 923/2012 First edition, March 2023 UK Rules of the Air (SERA)] [2]
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  3. air navigation service provider (ANSP)  

    public or private entity providing air navigation services for general air traffic, including an organization having applied for a certificate to provide such services   [SOURCE: UK CAA CAP 1430 UK Air Traffic Management Vocabulary, Second edition, August 2017] [3]
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  4. airborne collision avoidance system (ACAS)  

    aircraft system based on secondary surveillance radar (SSR) (3.1.77)  transponder signals which operates independently of ground-based equipment to provide advice to the pilot on potential conflicting aircraft that are equipped with SSR transponders   NOTE1 The terms “ACAS” and “TCAS” (traffic alert and collision avoidance system) are often used interchangeably however there is a difference between the two terms: ACAS is typically used when referring to the technical standard, concept
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  5. airborne DAA  

    detect and avoid (DAA) (3.1.32) system where all sub-functions are contained aboard the aircraft  NOTE Traffic DAA systems might include interoperability between conflicting aircraft in order to coordinate avoidance manoeuvring (e.g. “airborne collision avoidance system (ACAS)” 3.1.4).    
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  6. aircraft to aircraft (A2A)  

    communication technology that enables aircraft to exchange information between aircraft without the need for direct human initiation and/or intervention NOTE These technologies relate to objectives such as traffic detection, collision avoidance, and improving air traffic flow and efficiency.  
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  7. aircraft to infrastructure (A2I)  

    communication technology that enables aircraft to exchange information between aircraft and infrastructure without the need for direct human initiation and/or intervention   NOTE These technologies relate to objectives such as scheduling arrival/departure slots at vertiports and ground obstacle collision avoidance.
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  8. aircraft to everything (A2X)  

    communication technology that enables aircraft to exchange information, without the need for human initiation and/or intervention, with various entities in their surrounding environment. It refers to the exchange of data between aircraft to aircraft (A2A) (3.1.6)  and aircraft to infrastructure (A2I) (3.1.7)   NOTE These technologies allow for low-latency, high-bandwidth communication, can operate in various frequency ranges, and are an enabler of autonomous operations.
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  9. airspace observer beyond visual line of sight (AO-BVLOS) operations  

    beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) (3.1.19)  operation where the primary means of achieving safe separation from crewed aircraft is with an airspace observer, or observers, to provide detection of potential hazards and communicate this information to the remote pilot
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  10. airspace observer  

    person who assists the remote pilot by performing unaided visual scanning of the airspace in which the uncrewed aircraft is operating for any potential hazard in the air   NOTE The term “airspace” observer describes one type of visual observer, the other main type of visual observer being an uncrewed aircraft observer [SOURCE: UK CAA CAP 722D, Unmanned Aircraft System Operations in UK Airspace: Abbreviations and Master Glossary, 2nd edition, December 2022] [5]
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  11. air traffic management (ATM)  

    dynamic, integrated management of air traffic and airspace (including air traffic services, airspace management and air traffic flow management) safely, economically, and efficiently.   [SOURCE: ICAO Unmanned Aircraft Systems Traffic Management (UTM) – A Common Framework with Core Principles for Global Harmonization Edition 4, modified] [6]
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  12. air traffic management (ATM) system  

    system that provides air traffic management through the collaborative integration of humans, information, technology, facilities and services, supported by air- and ground- and/or space-based communications, navigation and surveillance   [SOURCE: ICAO Unmanned Aircraft Systems Traffic Management (UTM) – A Common Framework with Core Principles for Global Harmonization Edition 4] [6]
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  13. airworthy  

    status of an aircraft, engine, propeller, or part when it conforms to its approved design and is in a condition for safe operation Note: Also see related term “flightworthy” (3.1.46) [SOURCE: ICAO Annex 8 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, Airworthiness of Aircraft, 13th edition, July 2022] [7]
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  14. artificial intelligence (AI)  

    ability of hardware and software to act appropriately in an uncertain environment, in which an appropriate action is that which increases the probability of success, and success is the achievement of behavioural subgoals that support the system’s ultimate goal [SOURCE: ASTM International, Autonomy Design and Operations in Aviation: Terminology and Requirements Framework (West Conshohocken, PA: ASTM International, 2019)] ) [8]
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  15. atypical air environment  

    volumes of airspace where crewed aircraft do not routinely fly and the likelihood of an otherwise unmitigated encounter with a crewed aircraft is reduced to an acceptable level   NOTE 1 Examples include airspace near manmade structures such as buildings or high voltage powerlines, or at altitudes above those achievable by most crewed civil aircraft. NOTE 2 Atypical air environments might exist within segregated or non-segregated airspace, however the main purpose of their identifi
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  16. atypical beyond visual line of sight (AT-BVLOS) operations  

    beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) (3.1.19) operation where the primary means of achieving safe separation from crewed aircraft is by operating within a non-segregated atypical air environment where the likelihood of an otherwise unmitigated encounter with a crewed aircraft is reduced to an acceptable level
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  17. automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B)  

    means by which aircraft, aerodrome vehicles and other objects can automatically transmit and/or receive data such as identification, position and additional data, as appropriate, in a broadcast mode via a data link NOTE ADS-B is a form of Electronic Conspicuity (EC) (3.1.42) . [SOURCE: ICAO Doc 4444 Procedures for Air Navigation Services, Air Traffic Management, 16th Edition, 2016] [9]
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  18. autonomous charging  

    ability of an aircraft to connect to a charging station, then initiate, monitor and complete the charging process without human intervention   NOTE for an” eVTOL” (3.1.43) , this requires charging infrastructure which may be available, for example, at a “vertiport (VPT)” (3.1.88)
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C
  1. centralized flight crew  

    all flight crew members are co-located and within direct verbal communication range of one another NOTE An example would be an operation where the remote pilot and payload operator are side by side.
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  2. collision avoidance  

    last resort actions or manoeuvres which are executed to resolve conflicts if the strategic and tactical phases of deconfliction did not prevent the hazard from being encountered   NOTE Also see related term deconfliction (3.1.30)   [SOURCE: ICAO: Manual on Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) Doc 10019, First edition,2015] [10]  
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  3. command and control (C2) link  

    command-and-control data link between uncrewed aircraft (UA) (3.1.82) and its command unit for the purposes of managing the flight   NOTE: Descriptions of how a C2 link is achieved include the terms “direct command and control (C2) link” (3.1.33) and “network command and control (C2)” (3.1.67). [SOURCE: UK CAA CAP 722D, Unmanned Aircraft System Operations in UK Airspace: Abbreviations and Master Glossary, 2nd edition, December 2022] [5]
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  4. command, control and communications (C3) link  

    command and control (C2) link (3.1.22) elements with the addition of a two-way communications capability (usually voice) between the remote pilot and a relevant air traffic service which is normally relayed via the uncrewed aircraft
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  5. command and control link communications service provider (C2CSP)  

    service provider utilized by the uncrewed aircraft system (UAS) (3.1.83)  for the provision of a command and control (C2) link (3.1.22)  capability
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  6. contingency volume  

    volume of airspace that provides a buffer around the flight volume (3.1.45)   NOTE If the “uncrewed aircraft (UA)” (3.1.82)  leaves the flight volume and enters the contingency volume, then the contingency procedures, documented in the “operations manual” (3.1.69)  must be activated. [SOURCE: UK CAA CAP 722D, Unmanned Aircraft System Operations in UK Airspace: Abbreviations and Master Glossary, 2nd edition, December 2022] [5]
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